Sandstorm Blog

Lisa
Sandstorm Launches New Raddon Website

At Sandstorm®, we know a thing or two about creating great user experiences. That’s why working with Raddon to develop their new website was such a perfect fit.

For Raddon, 2016 was a transitional year. Fiserv purchased the company, which gave Raddon the opportunity to create a new, visually appealing website that aligned with Fiserv’s look and feel.

With the launch, we were able to help Raddon:

  • Build brand equity through beautiful web design that complements their parent company.
  • Create a consistent experience for Raddon and Raddon Report visitors by combining the domains.
  • Improve lead generation by implementing an e-commerce solution that makes it easier to purchase research reports and register for events.

We’re honored to help Raddon in their mission to improve financial performance through research and help financial institutions achieve sustainable growth. See the new Raddon website for yourself.

This blog was posted by Lisa on April 6, 2017.
Lisa Goepfrich

About the Author

Lisa Goepfrich

Lisa is a Digital Strategist who is extraordinarily adept at building visual stories.

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Bill Kurland
Content Marketing

Content marketing is the cornerstone of any successful digital marketing strategy, but it’s not enough just to create compelling content. You also have to think through how users engage with your content.

Since almost 90 percent of users are less likely to come back to a website after a bad experience, you really have to create a great experience right from the start. But don’t worry; creating compelling, user-friendly content isn’t as hard as it sounds. With a few simple changes, you can pack a serious punch. In fact, you’re probably following some of these best practices already.

1. Write content that’s scannable.

Like most readers, you’re probably skimming this article. Nielsen Norman Group, a leading UX research firm, found that 4 out of 5 users scan web pages looking for important information and fewer than 2 in 10 read word by word.

To deliver useful information to your users, your content needs to be scannable. You can make your content more user-friendly by following these best practices for web content. Start with the top 10 pages your users visit the most on your site and apply these principles:

  • Think mobile first—look at how your content displays on a device.
  • Use meaningful sub-headings instead of overly clever ones.
  • Turn items listed in a paragraph into a bulleted list.
  • Keep paragraphs to a single idea, and keep them concise. Paragraphs can have just 2-3 sentences.
  • Edit your content, then edit again.

2. Use hyperlinks within your body content—and make them stand out.

Hyperlinks—the colorful text that links to other pages—are essential to a great user experience. They serve as signposts on the road to discovery and help users explore your content in a meaningful way.

Underlined text in a contrasting color is the best way to communicate a hyperlink, and it’s what most users expect. Using a longer phrase of three or four words is more engaging than a single keyword, and using really engaging language related to the link is even better.

Just remember not to overdo it; two to three links on a page is plenty for content of 450 words or less.

3. Create engaging and attractive calls to action.

Whether you’re trying to increase newsletter signups, encourage engagement, or promote an event, an appealing call to action (CTA) will improve your results.

What’s the key to an enticing CTA? Use a vibrant color from your brand style to draw attention to buttons, and give them a consistent look and feel. Use verbs in your CTA copy that tell users what you want them to do and what they get in return:

  • Register for the event
  • Request more information
  • Download this report

If you follow these tips, you’ll be able to make quick optimizations that have a real impact on your site. Your current users will praise the improved usability, share more of your content, and you’ll have laid a solid foundation for attracting new users who are essential to growing business.

This blog was posted by Bill Kurland on March 23, 2017.
Bill Kurland, Copywriter

About the Author

Bill Kurland

Copywriter Extraordinaire

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Joshua
ux, ux strategy, strategy, usability, 2017, trends

Everyone makes predictions on the next big trend for 2017. This year, we ditched the crystal ball to give you actionable UX strategies that will drive growth and innovation in your organization.

 

1. Tap into your data and do something with it

Are you collecting tons of data but not using it? Are you looking at pages of reports with no actionable information? These are lost data mining opportunities that can help prioritize initiatives and allow your business to expand or pivot. When data is combined from multiple sources and analyzed properly, it can help you make more informed digital marketing decisions that can save marketing dollars or drive additional revenue. For 2017, commit to creating an analytics strategy to regularly uncover insights from your data.

 

2. Stop guessing and simply talk to your users

Take the subjectivity out of internal meetings and go straight to the source. It’s easier and cheaper than ever before to have quick and meaningful conversations with your users through social, one-to-one phone interviews, in-person at conferences and events, and usability studies. (Did you know you only need 5-6 users from a particular user group to identify 80% of the usability issues?)

 

3. Build a customer journey map

Brand engagements are moving off computer screens to cell phones, tablets, wearable tech, gaming consoles, and even smart devices like refrigerators. Understanding all the various touch points along your customer’s journey is critical to providing the consistent, personalized brand experience they expect.

 

4. Look outside your industry for inspiration

It’s easy to see what everyone else is doing within your industry. To identify white space opportunities for your organization, look up and out (e.g., if customer service is your differentiator, look at Southwest Airlines or Disney). Businesses in other industries may have already solved the problem you are looking to tackle—it just takes a little mindshift to find them.

 

Turning these 4 UX strategies into priorities in 2017 will give you quantitative and qualitative rationale to make better (and less subjective) digital marketing decisions.  

 
This blog was posted by Joshua on January 18, 2017.
joshua sovell

About the Author

Joshua Sovell

As the Marketing Manager Joshua is in charge of crafting the Sandstorm narrative via compelling blog content and community engagement.

Joshua
user research, UX, usability, World Usability Day, UX research

There seems to be a holiday for everything now, including user experience. And Sandstorm couldn’t help but celebrate it.

The theme for World Usability Day 2016—Sustainable User Experience (UX)—unites UX and sustainability through the shared objective of creating unparalleled experiences. At Sandstorm, we understand the impact UX research and design can have on projects and, most importantly, people.

So we got excited to capitalize on our UX expertise while cleaning up our office recycling habits.

We assembled a team of eco-warriors—aka UX architects and marketing specialists—to investigate our team’s recycling habits. By utilizing user interviews—one of many types of user research—for this project, we were able to better understand current behaviors in the office and identify opportunities for improvement.

We asked our team members questions about their basic recycling knowledge, why they recycle, and what keeps them from recycling at the office. We uncovered two key findings from our research and, as a result, devised four ways to improve recycling.  

Key Findings

  1. The majority of Sandstormers want to, and do, recycle
  2. The most significant barrier to recycling is Sandstormers’ uncertainty as to whether an item can be recycled or not

Ways to Improve Recycling at Sandstorm

  1. Ensure bins are present by every desk and in every conference room
  2. Clearly communicate what can and cannot be recycled
  3. Reduce plasticware/food waste
  4. Explore purchasing a dishwasher

Usability is about tweaking what you currently have to create a more effective experience; our user research showed that—with Sandstormers already in the habit of recycling—we need only to implement a few minor changes to encourage greener behaviors. 

And just because we have action items now doesn’t mean our process is over. We will continue to track office recycling, and do follow up user research, to ensure office recycling is optimized for a greener tomorrow.

This blog was posted by Joshua on November 10, 2016.
joshua sovell

About the Author

Joshua Sovell

As the Marketing Manager Joshua is in charge of crafting the Sandstorm narrative via compelling blog content and community engagement.

Dubai skyline, user experience, UX, IA, information architecture

I recently had the incredible opportunity to travel to Dubai. It’s a city of extremes: intense 120° F heat, malls with skiing and diving—with tiger sharks—and architectural feats beyond my wildest imagination. Out of all these wonders, what impressed me the most was the ever-evolving infrastructure of this bustling, technologically advanced city.

In Dubai, the roads change constantly to account for all of the new construction. In fact, they change so frequently that residents and taxi drivers say they often run into a dead end or end up trapped on a road that has changed overnight. GPS isn’t just used for convenience in Dubai, it’s used for survival.

A website’s information architecture is a lot like a city’s infrastructure: as you add new information, you need to create new navigation. If you’re constantly changing where you place information and how customers navigate your website, your users will be just as lost as drivers in Dubai.

A common method to improve the user experience (or UX) of a digital space is to mimic a real world pattern. For example, e-commerce mimics a grocery store: you typically have a shopping cart, you add to the shopping cart, and then you go through the checkout process.

The challenge comes when you start building and adding on to the original experience. While Dubai’s original city center is pretty easy to navigate, as the city grew at a rapid pace the new roads ignored the original conventions. Often—to accommodate new construction—roads had to be shifted and changed, causing friction and confusion among drivers. When designing your website, it’s imperative that you account for how it may evolve in the future and avoid foreseeable challenges as your company grows.

Sandstorm has a dedicated team of UX design specialists—including designers, architects and researchers—who help clients build websites that utilize information architecture best practices and provide cutting-edge user experiences. 

This blog was posted by on August 29, 2016.
Safina Lavji

About the Author

Safina Lavji

As a UX Architect, Safina actively empathizes with users to bridge the gap between user needs and what the client delivers. 

Joshua
Hydrology responsive website.  beautiful bathroom picture

The Paris runways are not a normal inspiration source for home decorating projects. But that is exactly what inspired Sandstorm® when Hydrology came to us for a new website. Hydrology, a high-end purveyor of kitchen and bath furnishings in Chicago, wanted an online user experience that mimicked their sleek & luxurious products. To capture that opulence, Sandstorm® tapped into the ambition and extravagance of the fashion world.

 

The home furnishing industry standard is nearly the opposite of runway glamour. It features flat and transactional product images that focus on product details while ignoring the bigger task of a completed room. This limited industry representation was an opportunity to set Hydrology apart. Pulling inspiration from fashion designers like Burberry, Sandstorm® crafted the new online experience to feel less like a product website and more like an editorial spread of your dream house.

 

The photography-focused site presents an aspirational goal, while highlighting individual products. We utilized Masonry, a JavaScript gird layout library, to allow the photos to speak for themselves. The navigation is subtle so as not to distract from the quality products or the end goal of an exquisite environment.

Check out the new Hydrology site here

This blog was posted by Joshua on June 2, 2016.
joshua sovell

About the Author

Joshua Sovell

As the Marketing Manager Joshua is in charge of crafting the Sandstorm narrative via compelling blog content and community engagement.

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Reilly
Jesse Lankford Promoted to Interaction Designer

Business is booming over here at Sandstorm, and we have been fortunate to grow the talents of our staff to meet the rising demand.

Jesse Lankford, a longtime Sandstormer, is enjoying the latest of a long line of promotions we have been celebrating. Jesse now holds the title Interaction Designer, putting him on the front lines of innovation in the realm of user experience.

In his new role, Jesse is responsible for the design of any interaction between a user and the client. As a result, he will be heavily involved in our web projects, designing customer journey flows and information architecture to ensure that the digital experiences we build for our clients are optimized for the user.

Beyond wireframing and organizing navigation structure for the web, Jesse’s visual design skills will still be put to good use on numerous logo, print, brand identity, and presentation projects.

One half of Sandstorm's “New York office,” Jesse works remotely from his Brooklyn apartment. He feeds his inspiration through his side project, Loosey Goosey, which seeks to promote the work of emerging artists. We are very excited to see what the future has in store. Congratulations, Jesse!

This blog was posted by Reilly on May 29, 2015.
Reilly Willson

About the Author

Reilly Willson

Someday I'll need a real bio, but for now I'm busy creating awesomeness for our clients!

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Reilly
 Nathan Haas is now our User Interface Art Director

Sandstorm’s resident darts and lacrosse expert, Nathan Haas, now boasts the title of User Interface Art Director. In his new role, Nathan oversees user experience design projects with an eye toward optimizing the user interface.

Indeed, it is at this intersection of UI and UX where Nathan thrives. Never content with something that merely “looks pretty,” he is constantly pushing the team to design websites in a way that complements intuitive, user-centric functionality.

Don’t believe us? Check out the work he did on the Urban Innovations website. After teaming up with firebrand developer Kyle Lamble, the duo drove home a stunning product that marries crisp UI with a streamlined UX.

We can’t wait to see what this design dynamo delivers in his new role.

This blog was posted by Reilly on April 28, 2015.
Reilly Willson

About the Author

Reilly Willson

Someday I'll need a real bio, but for now I'm busy creating awesomeness for our clients!

Kellye
Sandstorm designed and developed a responsive website that helps child health

The American Academy of Pediatrics came to us with a great goal. They were planning a project in conjunction with the National Center for Medical Home Implementation (NCMHI). It would be a fun, educational microsite specifically built for the pediatrics community. Excited about the possibility of creating a healthcare microsite with a twist, we came on board.

The microsite’s mission is to educate users about a concept known as a “medical home.” The term refers not to a place, but to a system of proven best-practices for providing healthcare to kids. If we do our job well, the microsite will help clinics put these practices into action. The impact on children’s lives will be phenomenal.

Creating the site was a collaborative process. We worked closely with NCMHI to determine a user experience design that everyone from government policymakers to parents to pediatricians would find to be a useful, intuitive tool. We were able to give it a look that’s playful while still giving context to the information the site delivers. From there, we built the site using responsive web development so it would function smoothly for users on any device.

The microsite recently launched and we couldn’t be happier with the results. If you’re interested in seeing the final product, check out NCMHI's responsive website

This blog was posted by Kellye on January 30, 2015.
Kellye Blosser

About the Author

Kellye Blosser

Kellye’s unique approach involves a delicate balance of left and right-brained thinking. She most recently hailed from the corporate video world. Here at Sandstorm, she’s excited to bring strategic, innovative thinking to every project.

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Emily Kodner
Neurosurgeons Designing Websites?

Looking back at 2014, one of my favorite website projects was cns.org, the responsive website for the Congress of Neurological Surgeons built in Drupal.

Why was it my favorite? Because they were strategic and truly embraced user-centered design.

A focus on user needs

User-centered design takes the subjectivity out of the decision-making process. We didn’t have to define user needs because we had talked to users firsthand. And, as it turns out, neurosurgeons are some of the most direct and decisive users that we’ve ever interviewed.

Because we interviewed stakeholders, we knew the organization’s priorities and were able to strike the right balance between business needs and user needs (hint: you can’t meet the first without meeting the second).

Navigation designed by users

Who better to organize the navigation than the users themselves? We asked CNS members to sort cards (each corresponding to a page on the site) into groups and create labels for the groups they made. Those labels became our navigation. Best practices can tell us how many menu items to have or how flat or deep to make the navigational structure, but only users can really tell us how to intuitively group and label pages and sections.

User tested designs

A neurosurgeon’s time is particularly hard to come by. To ensure we had adequate participation in our usability study, we took our wireframe prototype to the CNS Annual Meeting where we had a captive audience. This was a great opportunity to identify potential stumbling blocks and to allow users to weigh in on areas where there had been internal debate.

We love making great user experiences, and we are able to make the best experiences when we talk to users early and often. That’s why this was one of my favorite projects of 2014.

This blog was posted by Emily Kodner on December 11, 2014.
Emily Kodner

About the Author

Emily Kodner

Emily is our Senior Director of Client Delivery. She consults with clients, leads projects and works alongside our team of creatives and developers to provide solutions to complex business challenges.

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