Sandstorm Blog

Lisa
Sandstorm Launches New Raddon Website

At Sandstorm®, we know a thing or two about creating great user experiences. That’s why working with Raddon to develop their new website was such a perfect fit.

For Raddon, 2016 was a transitional year. Fiserv purchased the company, which gave Raddon the opportunity to create a new, visually appealing website that aligned with Fiserv’s look and feel.

With the launch, we were able to help Raddon:

  • Build brand equity through beautiful web design that complements their parent company.
  • Create a consistent experience for Raddon and Raddon Report visitors by combining the domains.
  • Improve lead generation by implementing an e-commerce solution that makes it easier to purchase research reports and register for events.

We’re honored to help Raddon in their mission to improve financial performance through research and help financial institutions achieve sustainable growth. See the new Raddon website for yourself.

This blog was posted by Lisa on April 6, 2017.
Lisa Goepfrich

About the Author

Lisa Goepfrich

Lisa is a Digital Strategist who is extraordinarily adept at building visual stories.

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Joshua
Alliance for Audited Media, AAM, Responsive Website, Web Design, Web Development, Content Audit

Here at Sandstorm we don’t simply “refresh” a website, we help businesses evolve their brand. Which is exactly what we did for Alliance for Audited Media (AAM) when they wanted their website to project a more modern feel with digital prowess. 

Our first move was a content audit to get our arms around the site and understand the complex mission of AAM (empowering media professionals with trusted verification and data). From there we created a set of information architecture (IA) guidelines that informed the responsive website design. Through our thoughtful research and strict IA guidelines we were able to deliver a new website, with approachable messaging, that spoke to their various audiences. 

This blog was posted by Joshua on October 28, 2016.
joshua sovell

About the Author

Joshua Sovell

As the Marketing Manager Joshua is in charge of crafting the Sandstorm narrative via compelling blog content and community engagement.

Joshua
Responsive web app

While it would have been easy to take a don’t-mess-with-success approach, our warrior spirit drove us to collaborate with a large insurance company's federal employee program to further optimize their existing responsive web application (which we built a year earlier) to continue to increase online enrollment.

We started with a thoughtful review of their Google Analytics and conducted a heuristic analysis of the app. This allowed us to dig into the data analytics and find new opportunities to improve the application. Combine that with our existing expertise in the FEP program, and we were able to make some adjustments and update the overall interface to provide their users with an even more intuitive tool to help them find a benefit plan that fits their needs.

Sandstorm® is ready to help you develop a web app to convert your users.

This blog was posted by Joshua on October 19, 2016.
joshua sovell

About the Author

Joshua Sovell

As the Marketing Manager Joshua is in charge of crafting the Sandstorm narrative via compelling blog content and community engagement.

Joshua
Ensono, branding, tech, mainframe, brand strategy, content strategy, marketing strategy, web development

Machines possessing hopes and dreams is a classic theme explored in science fiction. Sandstorm® explored this theme when Acxiom IT restructured their organization and needed a rebrand to reflect their new position as a tech company that dreams of the future.

Acxiom IT recently became a standalone infrastructure management services business, which required a new name and brand strategy to set them apart from their former parent company. Sandstorm® was hired to guide the 46-year-old business as they developed a new corporate identity. The result: the Ensono brand and a vision for the future.

Sandstorm®'s first step was diligent research. We examined the client's history, needs, behaviors and desires to understand where they've been and devised a marketing strategy to help them reach where they wanted to go. In speaking with their senior leadership, it became clear that they wanted to position themselves as a solution that meets the needs of the present and the future. Although they offered industry-leading mainframe solutions, Ensono needed help representing themselves as a company that develops and innovates for the future.

With renewed focus on addressing current client needs while engineering solutions for the demands of tomorrow, we turned to creating a new name. Sandstorm® went international while exploring the concepts of progress and dreaming: "enso" is a Zen concept that refers to strength and creativity, and "in sogno" is an Italian expression meaning "in dreams." By merging these words and concepts together, Ensono, or the company that dreams, was created. This idea of inventive and adaptable thinking followed through the positioning statement, key messages, content marketing tactics, and digital marketing strategies.

Sandstorm® assisted Ensono with their brand launch and website development and has continued to partner with them on many projects including: collateral materials, promotional video, product campaigns, corporate signage, and assisting with the interior design of their new office space.

If you are dreaming of a new marketing strategy, Sandstorm can make it a reality.  

 

This blog was posted by Joshua on August 4, 2016.
joshua sovell

About the Author

Joshua Sovell

As the Marketing Manager Joshua is in charge of crafting the Sandstorm narrative via compelling blog content and community engagement.

Amanda T
Sandstorm develops a responsive website for Urban Innovations

Our relationship with Urban Innovations began way back in 2007 when we originally designed their website. So by the time 2015 rolled around, we were all in agreement that it was time to give the site a fresh, new look with a user experience design that would attract new tenants and investors alike.

In addition to the Drupal website development project, we took this opportunity to reflect upon the evolution of the Urban Innovations brand. We worked closely with Urban Innovations to develop their new brand positioning and value proposition to ensure that the web content clearly and directly communicates what visitors want and need to know, all while optimizing the content for search engines.

The end result: an easily updatable, responsive website that communicates the Urban Innovations difference. The tablet and mobile menus make the site easily accessible on any device, and the parallax on the homepage draws visitors into the experience. The commercial and affordable property sections allow Urban Innovations to show off their real estate portfolio while also providing users with pertinent information about amenities and neighborhood details.

Check out the new urbaninnovations.com, and you’ll see why we’re so excited about it!

This blog was posted by Amanda T on April 22, 2015.
Amanda Tacker

About the Author

Amanda Tacker

Amanda is a Digital Strategist with several years of experience on both the agency and client sides, with both B2B and B2C clients.

Kellye
Sandstorm designed and developed a responsive website that helps child health

The American Academy of Pediatrics came to us with a great goal. They were planning a project in conjunction with the National Center for Medical Home Implementation (NCMHI). It would be a fun, educational microsite specifically built for the pediatrics community. Excited about the possibility of creating a healthcare microsite with a twist, we came on board.

The microsite’s mission is to educate users about a concept known as a “medical home.” The term refers not to a place, but to a system of proven best-practices for providing healthcare to kids. If we do our job well, the microsite will help clinics put these practices into action. The impact on children’s lives will be phenomenal.

Creating the site was a collaborative process. We worked closely with NCMHI to determine a user experience design that everyone from government policymakers to parents to pediatricians would find to be a useful, intuitive tool. We were able to give it a look that’s playful while still giving context to the information the site delivers. From there, we built the site using responsive web development so it would function smoothly for users on any device.

The microsite recently launched and we couldn’t be happier with the results. If you’re interested in seeing the final product, check out NCMHI's responsive website

This blog was posted by Kellye on January 30, 2015.
Kellye Blosser

About the Author

Kellye Blosser

Kellye’s unique approach involves a delicate balance of left and right-brained thinking. She most recently hailed from the corporate video world. Here at Sandstorm, she’s excited to bring strategic, innovative thinking to every project.

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Kyle
Seeing the Possibilities, Pushing our Drupal Web Development, and Showing Off with the Sandstorm Website

Earlier in the year, I was fortunate enough to take part in launching the new Sandstorm website in Drupal. For those of you who’ve been here before, you know it’s a long winding road from the initial concept, marketing, content strategy, and design before you even begin the black magic known as Drupal web development.

It’s an ongoing, almost never ending, process.

Once you push through those phases and launch your first website, it can come as a surprise, to some, that the website isn’t actually complete. In fact, some of the most exciting features from the initial concept may have not made it into the final product. Instead, at launch, you’re more likely left with a large todo list of development ideas you would still like to see implemented.

What can we do next?

This is when most of us toss around the phrase “phase two”, but a website is, and always will be, a work in progress. This is one of the most exciting parts about working on the Sandstorm website in Drupal, because I knew when developing each section that this was just the first draft. Now that we are finishing up the year I have begun thinking about our website again. A year is a long time and, with “learning and sharing” being one of the core values at Sandstorm, I have learned a lot and can’t wait to begin pushing our Drupal development further than where it is right now.  

“The Results”

A new website, responsive web design or Drupal module is a great way to see each department flex their creative muscles and show the industry what we can really do, and good work immediately pays off. The increase in high-quality leads led to new clients, which led to our explosive growth, which ultimately led to taking over that office next door. This might be one of the coolest aspects of the entire project.

This blog was posted by Kyle on December 14, 2014.
Kyle Lamble

About the Author

Kyle Lamble

Kyle is your stereotypical bluehat hacker, by day, who wants you to upgrade your browser to support his love for cutting edge web development techniques. By night, he is a curator and publisher of art. Co-founder of Loosey Goosey Art, Kyle spends much of his off time helping artists find their inner potential.

Emily Kodner
Neurosurgeons Designing Websites?

Looking back at 2014, one of my favorite website projects was cns.org, the responsive website for the Congress of Neurological Surgeons built in Drupal.

Why was it my favorite? Because they were strategic and truly embraced user-centered design.

A focus on user needs

User-centered design takes the subjectivity out of the decision-making process. We didn’t have to define user needs because we had talked to users firsthand. And, as it turns out, neurosurgeons are some of the most direct and decisive users that we’ve ever interviewed.

Because we interviewed stakeholders, we knew the organization’s priorities and were able to strike the right balance between business needs and user needs (hint: you can’t meet the first without meeting the second).

Navigation designed by users

Who better to organize the navigation than the users themselves? We asked CNS members to sort cards (each corresponding to a page on the site) into groups and create labels for the groups they made. Those labels became our navigation. Best practices can tell us how many menu items to have or how flat or deep to make the navigational structure, but only users can really tell us how to intuitively group and label pages and sections.

User tested designs

A neurosurgeon’s time is particularly hard to come by. To ensure we had adequate participation in our usability study, we took our wireframe prototype to the CNS Annual Meeting where we had a captive audience. This was a great opportunity to identify potential stumbling blocks and to allow users to weigh in on areas where there had been internal debate.

We love making great user experiences, and we are able to make the best experiences when we talk to users early and often. That’s why this was one of my favorite projects of 2014.

This blog was posted by Emily Kodner on December 11, 2014.
Emily Kodner

About the Author

Emily Kodner

Emily is our Senior Director of Client Delivery. She consults with clients, leads projects and works alongside our team of creatives and developers to provide solutions to complex business challenges.

Will
Responsive Web Development earns Drew and Alma a sweet treat

This morning the Sandstormers were greeted by a very welcome surprise from Sweet Sensations Bakery. This assortment of scones, cupcakes, and, my personal favorite, coffee was a thank you gift from our partner .orgSource. We recently developed their brand new responsive site (all made in Drupal). Take a look at their site on your desktop, tablet and smartphone. We’re really proud of it, and we’re glad that .orgSource is, too!

Thank you to Sherry, Tara and the rest of the .orgSource team for this thoughtful gift and the opportunity to develop your new responsive site. Congratulations!

This blog was posted by Will on July 10, 2013.
Will Biby

About the Author

Will Biby

Will wears many hats at Sandstorm. From writing web content to executing social media strategies, he is quick to act and insistent on a job done right. Will enjoys writing, so expect to hear from him often on the blog.

Will
Top 7 Responsive Sites from 1996 (Yes, 1996)

1996 was a crazy time. Everyone was shouting “Show Me the Money!” or using a Fargo, ND accent. We were just meeting Kato Kaelin and teaching our friends the “Macarena”.

It was a huge year, the U.S. hosted the centennial Olympic Games in Atlanta, and Star Wars was back in theaters for the first time since its original release. And oh yeah, people started using the internet more and more. Sure it was on Mosaic and Netscape browsers, but the World Wide Web was in more households than ever. The sites were amazing by 1996 standards, and well... “interesting” by 2013 standards.

Exhibit A:

Accidentally responsive?

There is one thing that was happening that no one anticipated, many websites from ‘96 are tablet responsive. What? I thought this was a new thing that only recently started happening.

Well, it just recently started happening on purpose. Many of the sites in ye olde ‘96, were built using HTML tables — which meant that they were adjustable based on the size of the browser window. So, with a small window you would have compact content and on a larger window everything was more spread out. In effect, the site was “responsive” to your large (or small), hot, CRT monitor. (Note to our hipster friends, do not make giant, heavy monitors hip again. Thanks.)

Are we saying to build using tables? No. Not at all. It’s just fun to see how things from the past relate to modern technology.

Trends tend to repeat themselves, and a lot from 1996 has come back again. Game of Thrones was first published then and now it’s a phenomenon. Tupac (1971-1996? R.I.P.) was “revived” at Coachella last year as a “hologram.” So, building sites that are adjustable based on screen size is back, too (just for different, more portable screens).

We’re reviving a few website gems that are excellent examples of “antique responsive”. (There’s also a wealth of great examples on the Wayback Machine, too.) Enjoy.

7. VH1.com (circa 1996)

6. Beavis and Butthead Do America

5. CNN: OJ Simpson Trial

4. Dole/Kemp ‘96 Campaign

3. CNN: 1996 Year in Review

2. Space Jam

1. Lego.com  (circa 1996)

 

[Bonus: This site is not “responsive,” but it’s a great period piece of the era. 1996 Internet World Exhibition]

What will we think about sites from today in 17 years? Which will still be around?

This blog was posted by Will on May 30, 2013.
Will Biby

About the Author

Will Biby

Will wears many hats at Sandstorm. From writing web content to executing social media strategies, he is quick to act and insistent on a job done right. Will enjoys writing, so expect to hear from him often on the blog.

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